Merk’s patent valid but Teva’s Nasonex generic non-infringing

In Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. (hereinafter referred to be as “Merck”) v. Teva Pharms. United States, Inc. (hereinafter referred to be as “Teva”) decided on November 16, 2016, Teva’s application of Abbreviated New Drug Application (hereinafter referred to as “ANDA”) no. 205149 had triggered Merck to file infringement suit against Teva in respect of US patent number 6127353 (hereinafter referred to be as “353” patent) which is currently listed against NDA number of New Drug Application (hereinafter referred to as “NDA”) number 020762. The‘353 patent is set out to expire in April 03, 2018 with Pediatric Exclusivity. NDA 020762 was approved for ‘NASONEX’ having MOMETASONE FUROATE (hereinafter referred to as “MMF”) as active ingredient in the dosage form EQ 0.05MG BASE/SPRAY. Merck further stated in its complaint that Teva’s ANDA application contained certification (PARA IV) that US patent no. 6127353 is invalid and unenforceable and will not be infringed by Teva producing its generic, the complaint also stated that Teva refused to allow Merck access to its ANDA application or samples.

Anhydrous Mometasone Furoate (“MFA”) was earlier patented by Merck in the early 1980s. MFA and MFM are the polymorphs. On July 3, 2014, plaintiff i.e. Merck brought this action alleging infringement. Merck filed an amended complaint on August 17, 2015, which Teva answered on August 31, 2015. Independent claims 1 and 6 and dependent claims 9-12 of the ‘353 patent titled ‘Mometasone furoate monohydrate, process for making same and pharmaceutical compositions’ were asserted by Merck.

Independent claim 1 and claim 6 have been reproduced below for the reference:

Claim 1:

9.alpha.,21-dichloro-16α-methyl-1,4-pregnadiene-11β,17α-diol-3,20-dione-17-(2′-furoate) monohydrate.

Claim 6:

A pharmaceutical composition comprising mometasone furoate monohydrate in a carrier consisting essentially of water.

Teva’s ANDA contains MFA as the active ingredient and has shelf life of 2 years. Merck did not allege the inclusion of MFM in the pre-formulation active ingredient of Teva’s formulation.

Teva had challenged the ‘353 patent on the grounds of double patenting with U.S. Patent 6,180,781 (hereinafter referred to be as ‘781’) and lack of subject matter description. Court rejected both the arguments and found the Patent to be valid. To ascertain whether Teva’s ANDA product contains any MFM during shelf life, Teva presented six different batches of its product to Merck. Merck’s expert, Dr. Victor Young (“Dr. Young”), testified in favor of Merck by placing a high premium on his ability to visually distinguish between MFM and MFA using a microscope. Teva’s expert, Dr. Leonard Chyall (Dr. Chyall), however, contended that protocol required visual observation to be paired with a more accurate method of measurement. Court observed that “Dr. Chyall has offered up a reasonable criticism of such findings. At bar, Dr. Chyall’s testimony is more credible and consistent”. Finally the court ordered in favor of Merck for the issues of validity but declared Teva’s product to be non-infringing the ‘353 patent. In the form 10K submitted with Securities and Exchange Commission on February 26, 2016, Merck apprehended decline the sale of Nasonex after the entry of generics. Here is their take ‘For example, a court has ruled that a proposed generic form of Nasonex does not infringe the Company’s U.S. patent for Nasonex. If the generic form of Nasonex receives marketing approval in the United States, the Company will experience a loss of Nasonex sales.’

About the Author : Ms. Rashmi, intern at Khurana and Khurana, Advocates and IP Attorneys. For any queries, please write to swapnil@khuranaandkhurana.com.

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